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Suite 100 & 102
Lafayette, LA 70508
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Knee

Normal Anatomy of the Knee Joint

How does the Knee joint work?

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Broken Bones and Injuries

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tears

The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of the major ligaments of the knee that is located in the middle of the knee and runs from the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (shin bone). It prevents the tibia from sliding out in front of the femur. Together with posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) it provides rotational stability to the knee.

For more information about Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tears, click on below tab.

Growth Plate Fracture

Growth plates are areas of soft, cartilaginous tissues present at the end of long bones in growing children. These cartilage tissues or soft bones later harden to become solid bones in adulthood once growing has completed. A fracture of these bones is termed a growth plate fracture. This type of fracture is most often caused from a fall or severe blow to the limb during sports activities such as football, basketball and gymnastics or from vehicular accidents.

For more information about Growth Plate Fracture, click on below tab.

Meniscal Tears

Meniscal tears are one of the most frequently reported injuries to the knee joint. The meniscus is a C-shaped fibro-cartilaginous structure in the knee incompletely covering the surface of the tibia where it articulates with the femur. It consists of the medial meniscus, on the inner part of the knee, and the lateral meniscus on the outer aspect of the knee.

For more information about Meniscal Tears, click on below tab.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tear

Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), one of four major ligaments of the knee is situated at the back of the knee. It connects the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The PCL limits the backward motion of the shinbone.

For more information about Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tear, click on below tab.

Shin splints

“Shin splints” is used to describe the pain and inflammation of the tendons, muscles and bone tissue around the tibia or shine bone (a large bone in the lower leg). It occurs as a result of vigorous physical activity such as exercise or sports. The condition is also referred to as medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS).

For more information about Shin splints, click on below tab.

Conditions

Arthritis of Knee Joint

Arthritis is a general term covering numerous conditions where the joint surface or cartilage wears out. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain free movement in the joint. This surface can wear out for a number of reasons; often the definite cause is not known.

For more information about Arthritis of Knee Joint, click on below tab.

Treatments and surgeries

Arthroscopy of the Knee Joint

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint. Arthroscopy is a term that comes from two Greek words, arthro-, meaning joint, and -skopein, meaning to examine.

The benefits of arthroscopy involve smaller incisions, faster healing, a more rapid recovery, and less scarring. Arthroscopic surgical procedures are often performed on an outpatient basis and the patient is able to return home on the same day.

Find out more about Knee Arthroscopy from the following links.

Total Knee Replacement (TKR)

A total knee replacement (TKR) or total knee arthroplasty is a surgery that resurfaces arthritic knee joint with an artificial metal or plastic replacement parts called the ‘prostheses’.

For more information about Total Knee Replacement (TKR), click on below tabs.

Minimally Invasive Total Knee Replacement

Coming Soon

Uni condylar Knee Replacement

This simply means that only a part of the knee joint is replaced through a smaller incision than would normally be used for a total knee replacement. The knee joint is made up of 3 compartments, the patellofemoral and medial and lateral compartments between the femur and tibia (i.e. the long bones of the leg). Often only one of these compartments wears out, usually the medial one. If you have symptoms and X-ray findings suggestive of this then you may be suitable for this procedure.

Find out more about Unicondylar Knee Replacement with the following links.

Viscosupplementation (Synvisc) Injection

Viscosupplementation refers to the injection of a hyaluronan preparation into the joint. Hyaluronan is a natural substance present in the joint fluid that assists in lubrication. It allows smooth movement of the cartilage covered articulating surfaces of the joint.

For more information about Viscosupplementation (Synvisc) Injection, click on below tabs.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction

The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the major stabilizing ligaments in the knee. It is a strong rope like structure located in the center of the knee running from the femur to the tibia. When this ligament tears unfortunately it doesn’t heal and often leads to the feeling of instability in the knee.

ACL reconstruction is a commonly performed surgical procedure and with recent advances in arthroscopic surgery can now be performed with minimal incision and low complication rates.

ACL Reconstruction Hamstring Tendon

ACL Reconstruction Patellar Tendon

For more information about ACL Reconstruction Patellar Tendon, click on below tabs.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the orthopedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

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